Accessibility View Close toolbar

RGP Lenses

Rigid Gas-Permeable (RGP) Lenses

First things first: RGP lenses are NOT the old "hard" lenses of the past. RGP lenses are much better for oxygen transmission to the cornea, the front surface of the eye, than the old-style lenses. RGP lenses are often used to help control myopia (nearsightedness) in younger children. They tend to fit people with keratoconus and other irregular corneal shapes/features better than soft lenses. RGP lenses are a popular option for bifocal wearers.

Wearing and Maintenance

Compared to soft contact initiation, patients trying RGP's for the first time will go through an initial adaptation period as the eye needs to get used to having "something on it". Once adapted to the lens, however, wearers often appreciate the enhanced clarity in vision over that provided by their glasses, and often in comparison with many soft lenses.

RGP lenses last much longer than soft lenses, needing replacement typically every 1 to 3 years. They require no additional daily maintenance when compared with soft lenses.

It's All in the Details

There are many, many different types of RGP's available to you depending on your requirements, the depth and breadth of which is too much to cover in this page. We have provided several links to very informative pages at right that will help you better understand RGP lenses and what to expect from wearing them.

View of an RGP lens on an eye. Note how small it is compared with a soft contact lens, which would extend beyond the iris (the colored portion).

aav-logo1.gif

Great in-depth information about RGP Lenses.

BostonLogo.gif

Our RGP lens maker of choice.

Rigid Gas-Permeable (RGP) Lenses

First things first: RGP lenses are NOT the old "hard" lenses of the past. RGP lenses are much better for oxygen transmission to the cornea, the front surface of the eye, than the old-style lenses. RGP lenses are often used to help control myopia (nearsightedness) in younger children. They tend to fit people with keratoconus and other irregular corneal shapes/features better than soft lenses. RGP lenses are a popular option for bifocal wearers.

Wearing and Maintenance

Compared to soft contact initiation, patients trying RGP's for the first time will go through an initial adaptation period as the eye needs to get used to having "something on it". Once adapted to the lens, however, wearers often appreciate the enhanced clarity in vision over that provided by their glasses, and often in comparison with many soft lenses.

RGP lenses last much longer than soft lenses, needing replacement typically every 1 to 3 years. They require no additional daily maintenance when compared with soft lenses.

It's All in the Details

There are many, many different types of RGP's available to you depending on your requirements, the depth and breadth of which is too much to cover in this page. We have provided several links to very informative pages at right that will help you better understand RGP lenses and what to expect from wearing them.

View of an RGP lens on an eye. Note how small it is compared with a soft contact lens, which would extend beyond the iris (the colored portion).

aav-logo1.gif

Great in-depth information about RGP Lenses.

BostonLogo.gif

Our RGP lens maker of choice.

Contact Us

We look forward to hearing from you.

Monday:

9:00am

6:00pm

Tuesday:

9:00am

6:00pm

Wednesday:

9:00am

6:00pm

Thursday:

9:00am

6:00pm

Friday:

9:00am

5:00pm

Saturday:

By Appt.

Closed

Sunday:

Closed

Closed

  • "We have noticed a huge improvement with our son during and after completing his vision therapy with A New Vision. He is reading at a much higher level, his grades have improved, his confidence has increased, and homework is not taking so long. His improvements are life changing! Thank you so much!"
    D.H. / Beaverton, OR

Featured Articles

Read up on informative topics

  • Curbing Macular Degeneration

    Macular degeneration represents one of the most significant causes of vision loss in older adults. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, an estimated 1.8 million people currently suffer from macular degeneration, with an additional 7.3 million people at risk of developing this ...

    Read More
  • Premature Babies and Vision Problems

    Prematurity can cause a range of vision problems. Fortunately, optometrists offer a range of treatments and devices that can improve your child's ability to see. ...

    Read More
  • What Do Your Eyes Say About Your Health?

    Subtle changes in your eyes may be the first signs of a health problem. ...

    Read More
  • Makeup Tips for Sensitive Eyes

    Does your cosmetics make your eyes water and burn? Try these makeup tips for sensitive eyes. ...

    Read More
  • How to Clean Your Eyeglasses

    Do you know how to clean your eyeglasses correctly? Take a look a few tips that will keep your specs cleaner. ...

    Read More
  • All About Amblyopia

    Amblyopia, also known as lazy eye, is a visual disorder caused by abnormal vision development, often occurring during infancy. Patients with amblyopia have reduced vision in one eye, because it is not working properly in conjunction with the brain. With early detection and proper treatment, loss of ...

    Read More
  • All About Glaucoma

    Glaucoma is a serious disorder that can damage the optic nerves of your eyes if left untreated. The optic nerve carries images from your eyes to your brain. If the nerve is damaged, full or partial vision loss can occur. In some cases, people develop glaucoma because the pressure in their eyes begins ...

    Read More
  • Binocular Vision: Disorders and Treatment

    For many, the term binocular vision conjures images of super powers or the rare ability to spot objects far away, but having binocular vision simply means having two eyes with which to see. Binocular vision does lend creatures with two eyes advantages over those with only one, such as enhanced vision, ...

    Read More
  • Diabetic Retinopathy: What Is It?

    Diabetic retinopathy refers to several eye problems that are characterized by damage to the light-sensitive retina, caused by excessive blood sugar levels. Almost half of Americans with diabetes suffer from some level of diabetic retinopathy. When glucose levels in the blood are not properly controlled, ...

    Read More
  • Glaucoma Care: What You Need to Know

    Glaucoma is the second leading cause of blindness worldwide, reports the Glaucoma Research Foundation. This common eye condition typically affects older adults, although infants and young adults are also at risk. Fortunately, however, cutting-edge research is improving diagnosis and treatment of this ...

    Read More