Contact Lens Exam

Contact Lens Fitting/Evaluation 

What is involved in a contact lens fitting/evaluation?

A contact lens fitting/evaluation is NOT the same as a regular eye examination.  It involves additional testing that people who do not wear contact lenses, do not need to have.  Patients wearing contact lenses require more of the doctor’s time and expertise.  In order to prescribe contact lenses, an eye doctor must complete additional tests:

1. Determine the proper contact lens prescription based on each individual patient’s glasses prescription, vision needs and corneal health and curvature. 

2. Examine the contact lens on the eye to ensure proper alignment with the cornea and lids.

3. Measure the vision with the contact lenses on the eye and make adjustments as indicated. Contact lens fittings and evaluations have different levels of difficulty; this depends on the types of contact lenses needed, the visual requirements of the patient and the health of the patient’s eyes.

4. Monitor the cornea, conjunctiva, eyelids and tear film for signs of negative health changes related to contact lens wear. 

A contact lens patient must have a Contact Lens Evaluation every year in order to renew their prescription.

A patient currently wearing contact lenses, in which the doctor recommends the same type of lens, is required to have a contact lens evaluation annually in order to maintain a valid prescription. The additional cost for an annual contact lens evaluation is $40. 

If you do not wear contact lenses currently and are interested in wearing them, or if the doctor recommends a different type of lens due to a change in eye health or vision needs, a contact lens fitting is required. There are four levels of contact lens fittings, depending on the type of lens needed and the complexity of the fit.  Fitting fees range from $40 to $200 and include any follow-up visits required to finalize a prescription.  New contact lens wearers will be given training on insertion and removal of the lenses and instructions for proper lens handling and care. 

We offer routine contact lens checks at no charge for the six months following your exam, thereafter
contact lens related visits are the patient’s responsibility. 

Why is the contact lens evaluation fee separate from the comprehensive eye examination fee?

Most insurance companies require doctors to separate routine comprehensive eye examination fees from any services performed due to contact lenses.  More time and testing is required for a patient who wears contact lenses; therefore, most insurance companies treat contact lens services as an additional and separate evaluation from the eye examination. In prior years, many insurance companies have paid for contact lens evaluation and fitting fees, but as of 2015, the majority of insurance companies do not. 

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